Monday Meme 7/31

But first, this article from Greg Haymes, who, as Sergeant Blotto, helped inaugurate the first episode of MTV with its “I Wanna Be a Lifeguard” video. I seem to recall that at least parts of the Capital District was NOT getting their MTV in the beginning because it was too scandalous, but I can’t find a reference to it. Can anyone from around Albany remember if MTV was being broadcast from the start? Is it true that original VJ Martha Quinn was born in Albany? And is there a correlation between Blotto’s appearance and Quinn? As the saying goes, this inquiring mind wants to know. But isn’t it ironic that the rebroadcast of those “rowdy” MTV videos tomorrow will not be on MTV but on VH-1 Classics?
***
Stolen, as is usually the case, from Lefty

Well, I AM brilliant. (I jest! I jest!) But I do relate to the conflicted nature, as described. And since I was at the page:

Oh, my. I saw this movie. Once. Once was enough. I think I talked about it afterwards with the two people I saw it with for longer than the movie ran, and it’s not a short film. I suppose there is a little of the rescuer in me.
***
Lefty takes the advice of his musical gurus, including me.

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Movies I have not seen

Tom the Dog has a post called Movies Everybody’s Seen But Me. He, and his many fans, listed their various picks. But I’m a librarian. I need a SYSTEM. So I went to the Wikipedia and found the list of highest-grossing films, unadjusted for inflation.
1 Titanic
$1,845,034,188-YES
2 The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
$1,118,888,979 NO. Never read the book, either.
3 Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone in the US)
$976,475,550 YES, with my niece, even though I’ve never read any of the books.
4 The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
$926,287,400 NO
5 Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace
$924,317,558 YES, unfortunately.
6 Shrek 2
$920,665,658 YES
7 Jurassic Park
$914,691,118 YES
8 Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
$892,213,036 NO
9 Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
$876,688,482 NO
10 The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
$871,368,364 YES
11 Finding Nemo
$864,625,978 YES
12 Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith
$849,997,605 NO
13 Spider-Man
$821,708,551 YES
14 Independence Day
$816,969,268 NO, and I’m pretty sure it was intentional at the time.
15 E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial
$792,910,554 YES
16 Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
$789,804,554 NO
17 The Lion King
$783,841,776 YES
18 Spider-Man 2
$783,766,341 NO, but I really want to.
19 Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
$775,398,007 YES
20 The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
$744,106,957 NO, but my wife did.
21 The Da Vinci Code
$740,961,259 NO
22 The Matrix Reloaded
$738,599,701 NO
23 Forrest Gump
$677,386,686 YES
24 The Sixth Sense
$672,806,292 YES
25 Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl
$653,913,918 YES
26 Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones
$649,398,328 NO
27 Ice Age: The Meltdown
$644,028,218 NO
28 The Incredibles
$631,436,092 YES
29 The Lost World: Jurassic Park
$618,638,999 NO
30 The Passion of the Christ
$611,899,420 NO, intentionally so.
31 War of the Worlds
$591,416,316 NO
32 Men in Black
$589,390,539 YES
33 Armageddon
$553,709,788 NO
34 King Kong
$549,216,896 NO
35 Mission: Impossible II
$545,902,562 NO
36 Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest
$544,521,411
37 The Day After Tomorrow
$542,771,772 YES
38 Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
$538,375,067 YES
39 Madagascar
$528,367,986 NO
40 Monsters, Inc.
$525,366,597 NO
41 Terminator 2: Judgment Day
$519,843,345 I don’t remember. I saw SOME T movie.
42 Meet the Fockers
$516,533,043 NO
43 Ghost
$505,702,588 YES
44 Aladdin
$504,050,219 YES
45 Troy
$497,409,852 NO
46 Twister
$494,471,524 YES
47 Toy Story 2
$485,015,179 YES
48 Bruce Almighty
$484,572,835 YES
49 Shrek
$484,409,218 YES
50 Saving Private Ryan
$481,840,909 NO

And then, since thsat list tended to skew towards the newer films with higher ticket prices, I also picked the list of highest-grossing films, adjusted for inflation, with the caveat: “Inevitably, a single inflation-adjustment cannot account for global inflationary fluctuations, and it also favors re-released films. Further, it treats all receipts as if they were earned in the initial year of release, which is clearly incorrect.
However, it does provide a more accurate (if estimated) long-term picture of financial success as it ignores current inflationary trends. Every decade since the 1930s is represented, with the exception of the 1950s.”
(If I described the films in the first list, I won’t in the second.)
1 Gone With the Wind (1939)
$2,699,710,936 NO. Keep thinking I ought to.
2 Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)
$2,425,862,786 YES
3 Titanic (1997)
$2,174,317,554
4 Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope (1977)
$1,436,811,009
5 Jurassic Park (1993)
$1,202,648,438
6 Bambi (1942)
$1,191,311,757 YES
7 The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)
$1,175,528,250
8 Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone in US) (2001)
$1,058,997,333
9 Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace (1999)
$1,054,205,059
10 The Lion King (1994)
$1,000,588,279
11 Independence Day (1996)
$991,657,039
12 The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002)
$985,287,400
13 The Sound of Music (1965)
$978,767,575 Not all the way through, NO.
14 Planet of the Apes (1968)
$977,132,692 YES. In fact, I saw all FIVE Apes films. On the same day. Don’t try that at home.
15 One Hundred and One Dalmatians (1961)
$966,612,040 YES, and the lead guy in the film is named Roger.
16 The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)
$945,007,557
17 Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (2002)
$935,804,406
18 Jaws (1975)
$912,899,628 NO. Initially, it was fear. Now, it’s just inertia.
19 Finding Nemo (2003)
$908,394,209
20 Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005)
$891,719,985
21 Spider-Man (2002)
$877,117,127
22 The Exorcist (1973)
$870,322,714 YES
23 Forrest Gump (1994)
$864,696,421
24 E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (1982)
$851,419,200
25 Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith (2005)
$848,480,246
26 Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004)
$811,115,427
27 Spider-Man 2 (2004)
$805,131,538
28 The Jungle Book (1967)
$802,223,303 NO
29 The Sixth Sense (1999)
$767,350,777
30 The Matrix Reloaded (2003)
$775,988,356
31 Ghost (1990)
$752,150,867
32 The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997)
$729,047,539
33 The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005)
$704,795,008
34 Men In Black (1997)
$694,579,105
35 Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones (2002)
$693,187,865
36 Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003)
$687,015,694
37 The Sting (1973)
$679,018,919 YES
38 Doctor Zhivago (1965)
$669,977,327 YES
39 The Empire Strikes Back (1980)
$665,181,894
40 The Incredibles (2004)
$648,484,866

Other movies mentioned in Tom’s column:
Buffy the Vampiire Slayer-NO
Poseidon Adventure-YES, but not the recent remake
Clerks-NO, but I will, I will
It’s a Wonderful Life-YES, but not until I met my wife
Goodfellas-NO, not all the way through.
Casablanca-YES
Citizen Kane-Rented it, fell asleep. NO. I’ll try again.
The Wizard of Oz-YES, many times.
Godfather-Yes, but not 2 or 3
Unforgiven-YES
Million Dollar Baby-NO, but it’s high on my list.
Apocalypse Now-NO, not all the way through, though I must have seen at least 2/3 of it.
The Conversation-currently on my DVR, recorded from TCM, as are Raging Bull and Nashville because I never saw any of them, but I will this summer.
Pretty in Pink-NO.
Close Encounters of the Third Kind-YES, both versions.
Monty Python movies- only Life of Brian, and whatever was after that.
Woody Allen movies -MANY of them
Rocky- Yes, also 2 and 4.
Adam Sandler movies- just the good one.
Oh, that’s enough of this.

THREE (plus) QUESTIONS: Heat Wave

As I’ve mentioned, I saw An Inconvenient Truth recently. I was already convinced about global warming.

1) Do you think there is global warming, and if so, is it reversable? What will it take? I think it’ll take political and personal will that I don’t see forthcoming. I’m particularly interested in Chris Black’s opinion.

2) What was the worst weather you’ve had this summer? For us, it’s been the near-constant rain.

3) Do you think Al Gore is running for President? (I don’t think so.) And why does he look so strange on the cover of last week’s Entertainment Weekly?
***
Several people have told me about the alleged dis of JEOPARDY! by one Ken Jennings in his July 19 blog post. I didn’t think it was a dis, I thought he was trying to be funny. He didn’t always succeed – faux cannibalism as humor? – but he tried.
In fact, the self-described iconoclast, who earned about 145 times what I earned on JEOPARDY!, had a rather revealing post in which he declares:

1970’s Sunflower is a better Beach Boys’ album than Pet Sounds. (Well, no, it isn’t, but it’s better than it was given credit for at the time.)
Celia Weston’s Jolene was a better Alice waitress than Polly Holliday’s Flo. (Flo WAS a bit over the top.)
I Vitelloni is a better Fellini movie than 8 1/2 or La Dolce Vita. (Never saw I Vitelloni.)
Oh Mercy is a better Dylan comeback than Time Out of Mind. (Maybe.)
John Stanley’s Little Lulu is a better run of classic kids’ comics than Carl Barks’ Uncle Scrooge. (I’ll have to ask Mr. Hembeck about this.)
Smashing Pumpkins’ cover of “Landslide” is better than the Fleetwood Mac original. (I’ve only heard the SP version a couple times.)
Marnie is a better late Hitchcock movie than Psycho. (Never saw Marnie.)
Timothy Dalton was a better Bond than anybody else since Connery. (Never saw Dalton as Bond.)
Felicity’s hair was better short. (Nah.)
You folks have any opinion on these?

“That Capitalist Rag”

At work, I scan the Wall Street Journal every day: the front page, and the second and fourth sections, Marketplace and Personal Journal (or some such – it changes during the week). But I’m usually reluctant when I go to the op-ed pages, where I, more often than not, find some apologist for the current administration. My co-worker and friend Mike, who semi-retired in the past month or so, would pass the paper along to me, with some cutting comment, such as “Here’s that crypto-fascist rag!” Occasionally, though, I find something actually useful. Here’s an example of each.

In Monday’s edition, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, announced that Muthannā is the “first province to assume complete responsibility for its law enforcement and security, independent of multinational forces.” That’s great. Really, it is, although it had been under the authority of non-U.S. troops. But look at the map of Iraq. As the Wikipedia says, “Iraq is divided into 18 governorates or provinces (muhafazah)”, which are:
Baghdād (بغداد)
Salāh ad-Dīn (صلاح الدين)
Diyālā (ديالى)
Wāsit (واسط)
Maysān (ميسان)
Al-Basrah (البصرة)
Dhī Qār (ذي قار)
Al-Muthannā (المثنى)
Al-Qādisiyyah (القادسية)
Bābil (بابل)
Al-Karbalā’ (كربلاء)
An-Najaf (النجف)
Al-Anbar (الأنبار)
Nīnawā (نينوى)
Dahūk (دهوك)
Arbīl (أربيل)
Kirkuk (التاميم)
As-Sulaymāniyyah (السليمانية)
All during the war, I’ve been reading about how X, (X being something positive) has happened in 8 or 12 or 14 of 18 provinces. Almost invariably, however, those 4 “other” provinces include Anbar, that large western province (#13), where the U.S. is moving troops from, it was announced this week, and Baghdād (#1), which has over 1/5 of the country’s population, and where additional U.S. forces are moving to. I’m afraid I’m not convinced that success in one relatively stable southern province will mean peace is just around the corner. Of course, this guy would likely disagree; naturally, I read about him in the WSJ this week.

The other piece was by Suze Orman in last weekend’s edition, about identity theft. There is pending legislation called the Financial Data Protection Act of 2006, H.R.3997. I’m always impressed how Congress comes up with such comforting names of legislation – USA PATIOT Act, anyone? Her point is about Section 6 of the bill:
(a) Preemption of State Information Security Laws- This Act supersedes any provision of a statute, regulation, or rule of a State or political subdivision of a State, with respect to those entities covered by the regulations issued pursuant to this Act, that expressly–
(1) requires information security practices and treatment of data in electronic form containing personal information similar to any of those required under section 2; and
(2) requires notification to individuals of a breach of security resulting in unauthorized acquisition of data in electronic form containing personal information.

Orman, talking about this preemption, notes that there are already strong laws in CA, FL, IL, NJ, NY, and UT, which means 130 million out of 300 million Americans. State reforms enable you to to activate a credit freeze, but this is a hassle to the business community. As for the federal law: “Only victims who produce a police report after their personal information is stolen would be able to put a credit freeze on their accounts. This approach is the equivalent of only selling locks to people who have already been burglarized.” This sounds “bug my Congressman”-worthy.
***
My friend Sarah e-mailed this piece about stolen elections. Generally, I’m not thrilled with unsigned pieces, but I trust her, and what it says is consistent with I’ve read before.

"That Capitalist Rag"

At work, I scan the Wall Street Journal every day: the front page, and the second and fourth sections, Marketplace and Personal Journal (or some such – it changes during the week). But I’m usually reluctant when I go to the op-ed pages, where I, more often than not, find some apologist for the current administration. My co-worker and friend Mike, who semi-retired in the past month or so, would pass the paper along to me, with some cutting comment, such as “Here’s that crypto-fascist rag!” Occasionally, though, I find something actually useful. Here’s an example of each.

In Monday’s edition, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, announced that Muthannā is the “first province to assume complete responsibility for its law enforcement and security, independent of multinational forces.” That’s great. Really, it is, although it had been under the authority of non-U.S. troops. But look at the map of Iraq. As the Wikipedia says, “Iraq is divided into 18 governorates or provinces (muhafazah)”, which are:
Baghdād (بغداد)
Salāh ad-Dīn (صلاح الدين)
Diyālā (ديالى)
Wāsit (واسط)
Maysān (ميسان)
Al-Basrah (البصرة)
Dhī Qār (ذي قار)
Al-Muthannā (المثنى)
Al-Qādisiyyah (القادسية)
Bābil (بابل)
Al-Karbalā’ (كربلاء)
An-Najaf (النجف)
Al-Anbar (الأنبار)
Nīnawā (نينوى)
Dahūk (دهوك)
Arbīl (أربيل)
Kirkuk (التاميم)
As-Sulaymāniyyah (السليمانية)
All during the war, I’ve been reading about how X, (X being something positive) has happened in 8 or 12 or 14 of 18 provinces. Almost invariably, however, those 4 “other” provinces include Anbar, that large western province (#13), where the U.S. is moving troops from, it was announced this week, and Baghdād (#1), which has over 1/5 of the country’s population, and where additional U.S. forces are moving to. I’m afraid I’m not convinced that success in one relatively stable southern province will mean peace is just around the corner. Of course, this guy would likely disagree; naturally, I read about him in the WSJ this week.

The other piece was by Suze Orman in last weekend’s edition, about identity theft. There is pending legislation called the Financial Data Protection Act of 2006, H.R.3997. I’m always impressed how Congress comes up with such comforting names of legislation – USA PATIOT Act, anyone? Her point is about Section 6 of the bill:
(a) Preemption of State Information Security Laws- This Act supersedes any provision of a statute, regulation, or rule of a State or political subdivision of a State, with respect to those entities covered by the regulations issued pursuant to this Act, that expressly–
(1) requires information security practices and treatment of data in electronic form containing personal information similar to any of those required under section 2; and
(2) requires notification to individuals of a breach of security resulting in unauthorized acquisition of data in electronic form containing personal information.

Orman, talking about this preemption, notes that there are already strong laws in CA, FL, IL, NJ, NY, and UT, which means 130 million out of 300 million Americans. State reforms enable you to to activate a credit freeze, but this is a hassle to the business community. As for the federal law: “Only victims who produce a police report after their personal information is stolen would be able to put a credit freeze on their accounts. This approach is the equivalent of only selling locks to people who have already been burglarized.” This sounds “bug my Congressman”-worthy.
***
My friend Sarah e-mailed this piece about stolen elections. Generally, I’m not thrilled with unsigned pieces, but I trust her, and what it says is consistent with I’ve read before.

FILM OBSERVATION: An Inconvenient Truth


Our date on Sunday was to see “the Al Gore film”. Yet, I was surprised how truly personal the story was.

You can read reviews in lots of places. Here are my reactions:

1) I left the theater angry, not about global warming – I was already ticked about that – but how I wished that Al Gore were more personable six years ago, rather than sounding like a policy wonk, talking about the Social Security “lockbox”. Maybe he would have won Tennessee, his home state, and what happened in Florida would have been irrelevant.

2) The film merely confirmed what I had been thinking for years: that the government’s low standards on highway mileage, which included setting standards then letting Detroit postpone them as “too expensive”, is why Ford and GM are in such trouble today.

3) I wish I could better explain to someone why the excessive rain in the Northeast earlier this month, and 118 in Phoenix earlier this week are caused by the same phenomenon.

4) Someone hissed when W briefly appeared on the screen. It wasn’t by me, but it could have been.

5) Carol and I had already agreed that we need better insulation for our house.

6) Mass transit is a solution, but how do we do that amidst urban sprawl? The issue of that aspect of development, not touched on in the film if I recall correctly, is a huge problem.

7) I feel sorry for Jimmy Carter, and for Al Gore too. When Carter was President, declared a Moral Equivalent of War (MEOW) on the energy crisis, and wore a sweater in the White House, it just wasn’t the message people wanted to hear at that point. Gore has had this same message for three decades before just recently started getting any real traction.

8) Not directly from the film: I had long thought that it would take $3/gallon gasoline before consumption in the U.S. would really change, I mean lower usage for a sustained period. What IS the price point, $4/gallon?

9) Go to the website here.

10) Go see the film. Tell other people to go see the film.

The Lydster, Part 28: The Greens


The best thing about the past month is that Lydia has had to spend time with her Grandma Green, her Aunt Leslie, her Aunt Marcia, and her cousin Alexandria. Because of the geography, there has been a bit of an imbalance. Carol’s farthest close relative, her brother Mark, lives in southeast Pennsylvania. My nearest close relatives live in Charlotte, NC. So there have many more occasions for Lydia to get to know her relatives on her mother’s side than n her father’s side.

This isn’t just a case of jealousy. My mom’s 78 and she really hadn’t had a chance to spend with her youngest granddaughter. In fact, with all of the traveling by the Greens to the Northeast, that was my primary goal: for the Greens to get to know Lydia better.

Of course, since they don’t see her often, they do tend to lavish on her. Her aunts bought her a tricycle this month, which she loves to ride. One Aunt bought her a Curious George stuffed animal, which is second only to old reliable Kitty Cat in terms of sleeping companions.

Now, if I were a GOOD blogger, I’d have pictures of all these folks. I’ve TAKEN pictures, but just haven’t had time to develop anything. In fact, all of these pictures were taken the same day, the same day the truck took out the tree across the street. The picture below was from when she was about six months old, because I have nothing else current. To paraphrase Bullwinkle J. Moose, next month for sure!

Anyway, Lydia knows I love her, and that’s the important thing.

Series Airing on Prime Time on More Than One Network

By popular demand.
SO here’s the list from the 1992 Brooks & Marsh book. I’ve made no attempts to update it – so no Angel, the Buffy spinoff – but those of you who have an updated version of the book can use this list as a starting off point:

Networks: A is ABC, C is CBS, N is NBC, D is Dumont

On All Four Networks:

The Arthur Murray Party
Down You Go
The Original Amateur Hour
Pantomime Quiz

On Three Networks

The Adventures of Ellery Queen-D,A,N&
The Andy Williams Show-A,C,N*
Animal World-N,C,A
Author Meets the Critics-N,A,D
Bachelor Father-C,N,A
Big Town-C,D,N
Blind Date (Your Big Moment)-A,N,D
Break the Bank-A,N,C
Candid Camera-A,N,C
Charlie Wild, Private Detective-C,A,D
Dollar a Second–D,N,A
The Eddy Arnold Show-C,N,A*
Ethel and Albert-N,C,A
Father Knows Best-C,N,A
Ford Theater-C,N,A
The Goldbergs-C,N,D
Life Begins at Eighty-N,A,D
Man Against Crime-C,D,N
Mary Kay and Johnny-D,N,C
Masquerade Party-N,C,A
The Price Is Right-N,A,C*
The Sammy Kaye Show (So You Want to Lead a Band, Music from Manhattan)-N,C,A
The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour (The Smothers Brothers Summer Show, The Smothers Brothers Show)*
The Steve Allen Show-C,N&,A
The Ted Steele Show–N,D,C
Tom Corbett:Space Cadet-C,A,N
Topper-C,A,N
Twenty Questions-N,A,D
Walt Disney-A,N,C
The Wendy Barrie Show (Inside Photoplay, Photoplay Time, Through Wendy’s Window)-D,A,N

On Two Networks

Actor’s Studio (The Play’s The Thing)-A,C
Adventure Theater-N,C&
The Alan Dale Show-D,C
Alfred Hitchcock Presents (The Alfred Hitchcock Hour)-C,N
The Amazing Dunninger (The Dunninger Show)-A,N
Armstrong Circle Theater-N,C
Bank on the Stars-C,N
The Battle of the Ages-D,C
The Bigelow Show-N,C
Bigelow Theater-C,D
The Bionic Woman-A,N
The Black Saddle-N,A
Blondie-C,N&
The Bob Cummings Show-N,C
Bosom Buddies-A,N2
Cavalcade of America (DuPont Cavalcade Theater, DuPont Theater)-N,A
Celebrity Time (Goodrich celebrity Time)-C,A
Chance of a Lifetime-A,D
The Charlie Farrell Show- C,N2
Circus Boy-N,A
Claudia, the Story of a Marriage-N,C
The Clock-N,A
Columbo-N,A*
The Continental-C,A
The Court of Last Resort-N,A2
Dan August-A,C2
The Danny Thomas Show (Make Rom for Daddy)-A,C
Davis Rules-A,C
The Detectives Starring Robert Taylor (Robert Taylor’s Detectives)-A,N
Diff’rent Strokes-N,A
Doorway to Danger-N,A
The Dotty Mack Show (Girl Alone)-D,A
Drew Pearson (A,D)
The Earl Wrightson Show (Earl Wrightson at Home, The At Home Show, The Masland at Home Party)-A,C
The Eddie Capra Mysteries-N,C2
Eddie Condon’s Floor show-N,C
Empire-N,A2
Ensign O’Toole-N,A2

The Ernie Kovacs Show-C,N*
The Family Holvak-N,C
Famous Fights-D,A*
The Father Dowling Mysteries-N,A
The Faye Emerson Show (Fifteen with Faye)–C,N
Fireside Theater-N,A2
The Gale Storm show-C,A
The George Gobel Show-N,C
Get Smart-N,C
The Ghost and Mrs. Muir-N,A

Harbourmaster-C,A
Hawk-A,N2
Hazel-N,C
The Herb Shriner Show-C,A*
Hey Jeannie-C,A2
The Hogan Family-N,C
Hollywood Opening Night-C,N
The Hunter-C,N*
It Pays to Be Ignorant-C,N*
The Jack Benny Show-C,N*
The Jimmy Dean Show-C,A&
The Jimmy Durante Show-N,C2
The Joey Bishop Show-N,C
The John Davidson Show-A,N&
The Johnny Cash show-A,C&
Johnny Staccato-N,A2
The Johns Hopkins Science Review-C,D
The Joseph Cotten Show (On Trial)-N,C2
Juvenile Jury-N,C
Keep Talking-C,A
Kojak-C,A&
Kraft Television Theatre-N,A
Kukla, Fran & Ollie-N,A*
Law of the Plainsman-N,A
Leave It to Beaver-C,A
Leave It to the Girls-N,A*
Let’s Make a Deal–N,A
The Liberace Show-N,C&
Life Is Worth Living-D,A
Live Like a Millionaire-C,A
Lux Video Theatre (Lux Playhouse)–C,N
Madison Square Garden Highlights–A,D
Mark Saber-A,N (recast-think Doctor Who)
Meet McGraw-N,A2
Meet Your Congress-N,D*
Midweestern Hayride-N,A
The Milton Berle Show-N,A&
Mission: Impossible-C,A&
Mr. & Mrs. North-C,N
The Morey Amsterdam Show–C,D
My Friend Flicka–C,N2
My Little Margie-C,N
My Three Sons-A,C
My World and Welcome to It-N,C2
Name That Tune-N,C
Navy Log–C,A
Omnibus-C,A
On the Line with Considine-N,A
On Your Way-D,A
The Perry Como Show (The Chesterfield Supper Club)-N,C
Peter Gunn-N,A
Pick the Winner-C,D (simultaneous)
Place the Face-N,C
Police Squad–A,C2
Police Story-N,A*
Press Conference (Martha Rountree’s Press Conference)-N,A
The Pride of the Family-A,C2
Private Secretary–C,N2

Quiz Kids-N,C
The Real McCoys–A,C
The Rebel-A,N2
Rebound-A,D
Red Barber’s Corner (Red Barber’s Clubhouse, The Peak of the Sports News)-C,N
The Red Buttons Show-C,N
The Red Skelton Show-N,C
Revlon Mirror Theatre-N,C
Richard Diamond, Private Detective-C,N
Say It with Acting-N,A
Screen director’s Playhouse-N,A
Shirley Temple’s Storybook-A,N
Somerset Maugham TV Theatre (Teller of Tales)-C,N
The Spike Jones Show-N,C*
Steve Canyon–N,A2
The Stork Club-C,A
Stud’s Place–N,A
Tarzan-N.C2
Taxi-A,N
Telephone Time-C.A
Tex and Jinx-N.C
They Stand Accused-C,D
This Is Show Business-C,N*
This Is The Life-D,A
The Tony Randall Show-C,A
Treasure Hunt-A,N
Treasury Men in Action-A,N
Truth or Consequences-C,N*
21 Beacon Street-N,A2
Two for the Money-N,C
The U.S. Steel Hour-A,C
The Vaughn Monroe Show-C,N*
Versitile Varieties-N,A
The Voice of Firestone-N,A
Wagon Train-N,A
We, the People-C,N
The Web-C,N*
The West Point Story-C,A
What’s It Worth (Trash or Treasure, Treasure Hunt)-C,D*
What’s Your Bid-A,D
Who Said That?-N,A
Wonder Woman-A,C
You Asked for It-D,A
Your Hit Parade-N,C
Your Play Time-C,N2
Youth on the March-A,D

The items in red I would suggest don’t belong on the list at all, either because the second network merely ran reruns of the first network programs (or, for anthologies, even reruns of other shows) – those shows are designated with a 2, OR the show is essentially a different show with the same name (two different attempts to create a series out of the comic strip Blondie, e.g.). The & sign suggests a totally different show. However, the shows with a * are shows with gaps of 18 months or more which I’ve determined are essentially the same show.

I realize that lots of these programs were on the early part of television – Dumont ceased to exist after the mid-1950s – but there are some network switches I remember very well for some reason, and I have italicized them above. And I should have remember Bionic Woman and, forgive me, GP, Wonder Woman.

Monday Meme 7/24

Q: Why does one do a meme THIS Monday?
A: Because tomorrow’s post took so long to do.

A Tosy meme.

1.Have you ever been searched by the cops?

Yes, in May 1972.

2. Do you close your eyes on roller coasters?

Generally not.

3. When’s the last time you’ve been sledding?

Pre-Lydia, i don’t remember.

4. Would you rather sleep with someone else, or alone?

Depends on who, I reckon.

5. Do you believe in ghosts?

Maybe.

6. Do you consider yourself creative?

Didn’t use to. Now, maybe, I think I might be.

7. Do you think O.J. killed his wife?

Don’t know. I followed this case about as little as one could and still live in the United States.

8. Jennifer Aniston or Angelina Jolie?

To do what?

9. Do you stay friends with your exes?

Many of them, yes. I think I invited at least four to my wedding with Carol, and at least two came. But my most recent ex, I have no contact with, even though she lives 30 minutes away

10. Do you know how to play poker?

Perfunctorally.

11. Have you ever been awake for 48 hours straight?

Yes, cramming for a calculus final exam my freshman year of college, which I passed; I was going to fail the course if I failed the exam. I looked at the calculus textbook a couple weeks later and understood almost nothing.

12. What’s your favorite commercial?

Ever? I don’t know. Probablty a Rice Krispies commercial where Snap, Crackle and Pop sing all the words to the song, and on the fourth verse all sing together.

13. What are you allergic to?

Penicillin, naprocyn, probably some grasses that give me hay fever.

14. If you’re driving in the middle of the night, and no one is around do you run red lights?

No. But the last time I drove in the middle of the night, I didn’t have a license. (The satatue of limitations HAS passed on this.)

15. Do you have a secret that no one knows but you?

Yes.

16. Boston Red Sox or New York Yankees?

Let’s go, Mets!

17. Have you ever been Ice Skating?

Yes. I’m really bad at it. In fact, the only reason I went last time I did was to woo Carol. (And it worked.)

18. How often do you remember your dreams?

When I sleep well, almost never. When I sleep poorly, almost always.

19. When was the last time you laughed so hard you cried?

Don’t remember, but it’s not a totally unheard of thing for me to do.

20. Can you name 5 songs by The Beatles?

Yes.

I saw here standing there, penny lane, strawberry foields forever, got to get you into my life, tomorrow never knows were the first ones off the top. I can give you about 155 more.

21. What’s the one thing on your mind now?

Paying my oral surgeon’s bill.

22. Do you know who Ghetto-ass Barbie is?

Thankfully, no.

23. Do you always wear your seat belt?

Yes. I HAVE been in cars when it was broken (usually in the back seat, ansd some years ago) – HATED that.

24. What cell service do you use?

None currently. Had Verizon Wireless, which cost WAY too much for the infrequent number of times we used it.

25. Do you like Sushi?

Not a lot. I’ll eat it. My wife LOVES it.

26. Have you ever narrowly avoided a fatal accident?

Yes, and I’m glad I had a seat belt on. My friend Lynn was driving in New Paltz on Route 32, heading south, and I’m in the passenger seat, when this car, which had been waiting for several seconds, sudddenly makes a left turn right into us. Lynn had a neck brace for six weeks. I was OK.

27. What do you wear to bed?

Depends on the weather. Usually T-shirt and pajama bottoms.

28. Been caught stealing?

Yes, candy or gum from a grocery store when I was about 6. My mother found it at home, and I had to bring it back and apologize. How mortifying.

29. What shoe size do you have?

10

30. Do you truly hate anyone?

Don’t think so, but let me think on that.

31. Classic Rock or Rap?

Given my lack of understanding of quite a bit of rap, though I loved the really early stuff, I guess classic rock, though certain songs can become so overplayed as to really irritate me.

32. If you could sleep with one famous person, who would it be?

Hmmm. I think this is a question more suited to Tom the Dog.

33. Favorite Song?

Oh, I can’t have A favorite song. It’s so dependent on mood, what I’ve listened to recently. It’ll change every time. This moment: As by Stevie Wonder, especially the “preach” part.

34. Have you ever sang in front of the mirror?

Yes, but not at the Y.

35. What food do you find disgusting?

Canned beets.

36. Do you sing in the shower?

Yes, but not at the Y.

37. Did you ever play, “I’ll show you mine, if you show me yours?”

Yeah, I was comparing scars with someone.

38. Have you ever made fun of your friends behind their back?

Probably, but no more so than I would to their faces.

39. Have you ever stood up for someone you hardly knew?

Yes, or didn’t know at all.

40. Have you ever been punched in the face?

Yes. In 6th grade by 8th grade bully.

You Are a Winner

All I really need to do to work this blog is steal stuff from Tom the Dog, Tosy, Gordon, and especially birthday boy Lefty.

The latter asked last week the favorite thing his readers have won. In the day, I was very good at winning things from the radio stations I listened to, because I had very good dialing fingers, an advantage lost when the redial button was invented. WENE in Endicott, near Binghamton, was my first station of choice, when I was in high school.
It was followed by WNPC, the New Paltz College station. From them, one of the first things I won this album by this singer I’d vaguely heard of named David Bowie, an album called “Hunky Dory”, with a bunch of weird songs which I liked for the most part. My roommate Ron, however, did not, except for this one song called Changes.

In my early Albany days, I listened to, and got stuff from WQBK-FM, Q-104.

But my favorite win was from a station I actually seldom listened to. In the summer of 1977, I was living in NYC, specifically Jamaica, Queens, with my sister Leslie and her then-husband Eric. One day, they had the radio on, and one had to be the ninth caller “with the phrase that pays, ’99X is my radio station’ ” AND be able to identify the last song played. Well, I was the ninth caller, I said the phrase that paid, and I knew that “She’s Gone” by Hall and Oates was the last song played. I won twice my age, which meant $48, real money for an underemployed telephone solicitor (TV Guide, Encyclopedia Britannica). I had to spend SOME of it though, and that turned to be the ONLY time I’ve ever seen the New York Mets play in person. Don’t remember the game or even the score, but I remember the joy being there with my sister. I also have an unusual affection for the song “She’s Gone”.
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Then there’s Eddie, the Renaissance Geek, who asks if a tomato a fruit or a vegetable? Answer: Yes, both. But if the Supreme Court says it’s a vegetable…
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Oh, I added two blogs to the roll, both guys from upstate New York with long hair, as it turns out. One, Byzantium Shores, I’ve been reading for quite a while, and just forgot to add. The other, Hydrogen Jukebox, is one I’ve waiting for him to post a second item within the same month. (And you may recognize the person in his very first post.)
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The Post Office has new superhero stamps. One guy I read, Gay Prof, will want two of the twenty stamps on the sheet. Belated happy birthday, GP.
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And lest I forget, happy birthday, sister Leslie!