March Rambling: mostly about me

roger2
My old buddy Augustus (who you FantaCo customers might have known as Matt), put this together for my birthday. Pic on the left is from the cover of the FantaCon 1988 convention program, drawn by the late Chas Balun. The image is on the right was John Hebert’s rendition from Sold Out #1, c. 1986.
This is about me because: It was so cool. And he wrote: “Thank you for turning me on to a world of literature far beyond science fiction and fantasy. Your are still an influence on this boychik. Long may you arrange. (books in order).” And you thought I couldn’t blush.

Now Jaquandor KNOWS how to celebrate my birthday. He added me to his sentential links here. He answered my question about football.
This is about me, obviously. (Sidebar: some highly educated person wrote “As is my want” recently in a mass e-mail I received. You have NO idea how difficult it was for me NOT to correct him. Jaquandor would NOT make this misteak, er, mistake.)

Tom Skulan of FantaCo is being interviewed for Theater of Guts.
This is about me because: I worked at FantaCo for over eight years I took the photo of Tom, and also the pic of the late Chas Balun looking towards the ceiling. I find it interesting that my photos of the store Continue reading

Advertisements

April Rambling: Ads about Rape, and Media

In response to her strong poem, Reflector Babe, Amy at Sharp Little Pencil received a link from Anna at HyperCRYPTIcal. It is to a UK ad considered the most shocking ad ever? Rape campaign aimed at teens to be shown. It’s sexually explicit (no ‘bits’ are shown), but it is powerful. This could not air in the US, I’m fairly certain, but the problem it addresses is very much an issue here.

What the New Sgt Pepper Cover Tells Us About Modern Britain.

And speaking of the UK, How news coverage evolves. Imagine how the Guardian “might cover the story of the three little pigs in print and online. Follow the story from the paper’s front page headline, through a social media discussion and finally to an unexpected conclusion.”
Continue reading

The Lydster, Part 97: One Surprise After Another

The Daughter always seemed to have far fewer birthday parties with her friends than most of her classmates. Oh, there would be the gatherings with family, including her maternal grandparents, and usually a pair of her cousins and an uncle and aunt. But it has been unbalanced. Once a couple years ago, we did a party at the State Museum with her friends, but that was it.

She indicated a few months ago that she wanted a surprise party; not sure why. But we decided to make it so. First, we had a little gathering the weekend before her birthday with her mom, dad, and grandparents, so she didn’t think we’d blown her off. Then we rented a room at the local bowling alley for a couple hours.

The morning of the party Continue reading

Random People with Birthdays on March 7

Pictured: Franco Harris and Lynn Swann (with Terry Bradshaw), Hall of Famers all, from the 1970s Pittsburgh Steelers

1980 Laura Prepon, actress
1974 Jenna Fisher, actress
1970 Rachel Weisz, actress
1968 Jeff Kent, baseball infielder
1968 Ricky Proehl, NFL wide receiver
1967 Zheng Haixia, WNBA center (Los Angeles Sparks)
1966 Jeff Feagles, NFL punter
1966 Mel Rojas, baseball pitcher
1965 Steve Beuerlein, NFL quarterback
1964 Wanda Sykes, comedian
1962 Taylor Dayne, singer
1961 Mary Beth Evans, actress
1960 Ivan Lendl, tennis pro
1960 Joe Carter, baseball outfielder
1954 Matt Frenette, rock drummer ( Loverboy) Continue reading

Let America Be America Again by Langston Hughes


Today would have been the 110th birthday of James Mercer Langston Hughes, “an American poet, novelist, playwright, and columnist.” When he died on May 22, 1967, I wasn’t that familiar with his work, but I knew that someone important had passed. He was born into abolitionist stock, had both black and white critics, but eventually became a leading light of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s.
Continue reading

Till I Waltz Again With You is not a waltz

Went to the doctor’s on Wednesday to deal with this chronic head cold/sore throat thing which is now a chest cold. She sent me to a place to get a chest X-ray to determine whether I have bronchitis or pneumonia; as it turns out, I have neither. So I’ve been home for a couple days, taking an antibiotic, using an inhaler, and consuming some cough medicine which is a “controlled substance.” Did you know a physician in New York state can electronically submit most prescriptions, but that “controlled substance” Rx has to be hand delivered?

This means I have some time to read blogs, but absolutely no energy to write anything. Continue reading

Would have been Mom’s birthday


As I mentioned at the time, I got a lot of wonderful remembrances and condolences regarding my mother’s death in February. And things are usually better now. But the first birthday after her death somehow has a special poignancy. I’m NOT calling her or sending her a card, or struggling over the fact that buying stuff for her became increasingly difficult, because she said she wanted for nothing.
Continue reading

Paul Simon: “How terribly strange to be 70”

I don’t think I can fully explain how INTEGRAL Paul Simon has been in my life, but I’ll try. In fact, I’ll try twice: once, now, for the albums related to his solo career, and again on November 5, for the earlier stuff with Art Garfunkel; November 5, Artie turns 70 as well.

Paul Simon (1972) – Here’s a video of a young woman playing Duncan at a Paul Simon concert; there’s a song I once could relate to.

There Goes Rhymin’ Simon (1973) – for a time, my favorite Paul Simon/S&G album Continue reading

Sean Lennon’s birthday; and it would have been his father’s

One of those signs that you are getting older is when you start saying things such as “I remember [him or her] when [he or she] was X years old [some age the person hasn’t been for a VERY long time].” And that’s how it was with Sean Lennon. I didn’t know him personally, but, to me, he was frozen in time at five years old, his age when his father was killed. Continue reading

David Crosby is 70…

…and somehow, I think the person most surprised by that fact may be David Crosby.

When he got kicked out of the Byrds in the late 1960s, he joined up with Stephen Stills, formerly of Buffalo Springfield, and Graham Nash, who had left the Hollies, to form what was generally considered to be the first “supergroup.” If I could remember the name of the group, I’d tell you. At least one of their first two albums, the latter with Neil Young, also formerly of Springfield, was in every dorm room at college. I saw CSN st some point in the 1980s at Albany’s Palace Theater.

Crosby was known for his left-leaning politics, and his excessive use of drugs and alcohol, which resulted in numerous arrests, multiple rehabs and a liver transplant.

My sister Leslie gave me this album about a decade ago Continue reading